Rilke’s “Requiem For a Friend”

Rainer Maria Rilke's "Requiem for a Friend" as translated from the German by Stephen Mitchell Rainer Maria Rilke (1875-1926) wrote "Requiem For a Friend" as a tribute to his good friend, the painter Paula Modersohn-Becker (1876-1907), who suddenly died eighteen days after giving birth to her first child. Rilke wrote it over two haunted nights … Continue reading Rilke’s “Requiem For a Friend”

The Universal Ouroboros

This was one of the first sites I returned to again and again in the early days of the net. I haven't revisited it for years, but came across the link in one of my old blogs, and realised I'd been lucky to find these reference to the Ouroboros in the years before the net … Continue reading The Universal Ouroboros

Twenty Key Concepts from Psychotherapy | The Book of Life – Sublimation

This is from a really useful website that is one of my regular go-to sites. It covers so many areas, and quite often I won't be quite sure what it is I need to read that day, but after a little dabbling - boom - I'll read something that resonates at that particular moment. Today … Continue reading Twenty Key Concepts from Psychotherapy | The Book of Life – Sublimation

Re-enchanting the Winter Solstice: an invitation – The Art of Enchantment by Sharon Blackie

"Turn on the radio or the TV, and we’re deluged by ads urging us to buy, buy, buy. Burn the planet, so that for one lunatic day of the year we can wear red hats and snowflake-embroidered sweaters and drink and eat more than is moral, frankly, and imagine everything is perfect and there’s nothing … Continue reading Re-enchanting the Winter Solstice: an invitation – The Art of Enchantment by Sharon Blackie

Mercury, Animism, and the Axis Mundi | Rubedo Press

These are selected extracts from a longer article that appeared on September 21st 2017 on Rubedo Press - link can be found at the bottom of this page Mercury, Animism, and the Axis Mundi GARY P. CATON. ANTHROPOLOGISTS suggest it was a “creative explosion” of primal art, such as cave paintings and figurines, which formally … Continue reading Mercury, Animism, and the Axis Mundi | Rubedo Press

Working through Depression with Alchemy

"More than a school of thought, alchemy is a gnosis, a "way" of knowing. It is a deliberate attempt to grasp immortality in which the process is paramount. We all embody the archetypal journey of life, consciously or unconsciously. We are born in our essential nature but it quickly becomes covered with a hard-shelled core … Continue reading Working through Depression with Alchemy

Nietzsche on How to Find Yourself – Brain Pickings

How can man know himself? It is a dark, mysterious business: if a hare has seven skins, a man may skin himself seventy times seven times without being able to say, “Now that is truly you; that is no longer your outside.” It is also an agonizing, hazardous undertaking thus to dig into oneself, to … Continue reading Nietzsche on How to Find Yourself – Brain Pickings

Encountering the Teachings of Gurdjieff: A Young Man’s Search, by David Ulrich | Parabola

"What Gurdjieff calls the magnetic center represents an inner formation that helps orient us in the right direction, toward what can serve our individual evolution and inner development. Our search is often born from contact with certain kinds of influences—books that may help show the way, other people that touch us in a deeper fashion, … Continue reading Encountering the Teachings of Gurdjieff: A Young Man’s Search, by David Ulrich | Parabola

Hermetic Rebirth and the Cave of Initiation

  Hermetism is often and wrongly confused with Gnosticism, which similarly originated in Egypt in roughly the same era. For present purposes, a few salient points of contrast will suffice. Like the God of Stoicism, the Hermetic God was omnipresent and omniscient through the material cosmos. In Gnosticism, by contrast, God was transcendent, and the … Continue reading Hermetic Rebirth and the Cave of Initiation

Visualization in Medieval Alchemy – alchemy as a science and an art aimed at the transformation of species

In Arabic classifications of science and philosophy, which were adapted in the twelfth century, alchemy was defined as a sub-branch of natural philosophy (scientia naturalis), sharing this definition, above all, with medicine. Thus, about ten years after the first translation of an alchemical text into Latin (Morienus, De compositione alchimie), Dominic Gundissalinus described alchemy as … Continue reading Visualization in Medieval Alchemy – alchemy as a science and an art aimed at the transformation of species