The Night of the Hunter – the most unusual and experimental film made in Hollywood in the 1950s

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwlSrpMK3VA

The film's score, composed and arranged by Walter Schumann in close association with Laughton, features a combination of nostalgic and expressionistic orchestral passages. The film has two original songs by Schumann, "Lullaby" (sung by Kitty White, whom Schumann discovered in a nightclub) and "Pretty Fly" (originally sung by Sally Jane Bruce as Pearl, but later dubbed by an actress named Betty Benson). The film was shot in black and white in the styles and motifs of German Expressionism (bizarre shadows, stylized dialogue, distorted perspectives, surreal sets, odd camera angles) to create a simplified and disturbing mood that reflects the sinister character of Powell, the nightmarish fears of the children, and the sweetness of their savior Rachel. In a 2007 listing of the 100 Most Beautiful Films, Cahiers du cinéma ranked The Night of the Hunter No. 2 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Night_of_the_Hunter_%28film%29

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The Remains of Elmet: a collaboration by Ted Hughes & Fay Godwin

The Ancient Kingdom of Elmet witnessed "Druidism; Britons, their fight against Rome and their adoption of Romanism; the start of Christianity and the clash with Rome's catholic Christianity; a Bardic tradition in a Brythonic tongue and then in the highest quality Latin, the struggle against the English; the struggle against the Norse; the coming of … Continue reading The Remains of Elmet: a collaboration by Ted Hughes & Fay Godwin

Tree Folklore: Birch, the Lady of the Wood – Jo Woolf

All images © 2016 Jo Woolf (from Tree Folklore: Birch, the Lady of the Wood - #FolkloreThursday) Beith’ or birch is the first symbol of the Ogham alphabet, representing the letter ‘B’, and ancient birch woodlands are immortalised in many Gaelic place names: examples include Glen an Beithe, Allt Beithe, and Beith in Ayrshire; the … Continue reading Tree Folklore: Birch, the Lady of the Wood – Jo Woolf

Edward Steichen – To Catch an Instant

"Photography records the gamut of feelings written on the human face, the beauty of the earth and skies that man has inherited, and the wealth and confusion man has created. [It is] a major force in explaining man to man." Steichen Quoted in Time Magazine, "To Catch the Instant" 7 April 1961 Edward Jean Steichen … Continue reading Edward Steichen – To Catch an Instant

The Celestographs: August Strindberg’s Alchemical Shots of the Night Sky

In the 1890s, Swedish playwright August Strindberg photographed the night sky without a camera or even a lens. These “Celestographs,” as he called them, were both a folly and an innovative work of experimental art. The National Library of Sweden has recently shared a selection of these photographs online, displaying the gritty textures of the … Continue reading The Celestographs: August Strindberg’s Alchemical Shots of the Night Sky

Song of Myself By Walt Whitman

Excerpts: Song of Myself By Walt Whitman Stop this day and night with me and you shall possess the origin of all poems, You shall possess the good of the earth and sun, (there are millions of suns left,) You shall no longer take things at second or third hand, nor look through the eyes … Continue reading Song of Myself By Walt Whitman

Bertolucci Born today: 16th March

  Bertolucci Born today: 16th March Last Tango in Paris. 1972. France/Italy. Directed by Bernardo Bertolucci Staring Marlon Brando, Maria Schneider, and Jean-Pierre Léaud.