Poetry, Music, Duende: Federico Garcia Lorca

(I've taken the liberty of adding photos and videos ~ArsArteEtLabore) Excerpt from: Desolation Row - Colm Tóibín In his late teens, Federico García Lorca’s main interest was music and song. He was steeped not only in the Andalusian folk tradition but also in the European art song. He loved the work of Schubert and Beethoven.Lorca’s … Continue reading Poetry, Music, Duende: Federico Garcia Lorca

Advertisements

Donkey-Skin by Charles Perraut, illustrated by Gustave Dore, Harry Clarke, and others

  Donkey Skin (French: Peau d’Âne) is a French literary fairytale written in verse by Charles Perrault. It was first published in 1695 in a small volume and republished in 1697 in Perrault’s Histoires ou contes du temps passé. It’s an unsettling tale of a King who wanted to marry his daughter, after his wife’s … Continue reading Donkey-Skin by Charles Perraut, illustrated by Gustave Dore, Harry Clarke, and others

The Wandering and Watercolours of Hermann Hesse

“This wind, into which I am climbing, is fragrant of beyonds and distances, of watersheds and foreign languages, of mountains and southern places. It is full of promise.” ― Hermann Hesse, Wandering I was very lucky yesterday, while mooching through piles of 2nd hand books at a Spanish fleamarket,  to spy and purchase a copy … Continue reading The Wandering and Watercolours of Hermann Hesse

The Three Princes of Serendip – origin of the word Serendipity

"The story has become known in the English speaking world as the source of the word serendipity, coined by Horace Walpole because of his recollection of the part of the "silly fairy tale" where the three princes by "accidents and sagacity" discern the nature of a lost camel. "This discovery indeed is almost of that … Continue reading The Three Princes of Serendip – origin of the word Serendipity

Letter from Anton Chekhov To His Brother Nikolay – conditions cultured people must satisfy

Letter from Anton Chekhov To His Brother Nikolay Translated by Constance Garnett: MOSCOW, 1886. … You have often complained to me that people “don’t understand you”! Goethe and Newton did not complain of that…. Only Christ complained of it, but He was speaking of His doctrine and not of Himself…. People understand you perfectly well. … Continue reading Letter from Anton Chekhov To His Brother Nikolay – conditions cultured people must satisfy

Nietzsche on How to Find Yourself – Brain Pickings

How can man know himself? It is a dark, mysterious business: if a hare has seven skins, a man may skin himself seventy times seven times without being able to say, “Now that is truly you; that is no longer your outside.” It is also an agonizing, hazardous undertaking thus to dig into oneself, to … Continue reading Nietzsche on How to Find Yourself – Brain Pickings

Hermetic Rebirth and the Cave of Initiation

  Hermetism is often and wrongly confused with Gnosticism, which similarly originated in Egypt in roughly the same era. For present purposes, a few salient points of contrast will suffice. Like the God of Stoicism, the Hermetic God was omnipresent and omniscient through the material cosmos. In Gnosticism, by contrast, God was transcendent, and the … Continue reading Hermetic Rebirth and the Cave of Initiation