Names of the Wind — Nick Hunt

  ELSEWHERE - A JOURNAL OF PLACE recently featured a piece by Nick Hunt who's book "Where the Wild Winds Are" (Nicholas Brealey Publishing) was published in September 2017.     Nick "set out to follow four, which seemed an appropriate number for winds, drawn by the romance of their names but also intrigued by their … Continue reading Names of the Wind — Nick Hunt

Evil Twins and Doppelgangers: What Meaning Does the Double Have in Folklore?

(from @FolkloreThurs - link to full article below) "Norse mythology features a strange type of double in the vardøger. In a weird form of reverse deja vu; the double does everything the real person is going to do before they actually do it. Witnesses report seeing or hearing a person before they physically arrive.The German writer … Continue reading Evil Twins and Doppelgangers: What Meaning Does the Double Have in Folklore?

Tree Folklore: Birch, the Lady of the Wood – Jo Woolf

All images © 2016 Jo Woolf (from Tree Folklore: Birch, the Lady of the Wood - #FolkloreThursday) Beith’ or birch is the first symbol of the Ogham alphabet, representing the letter ‘B’, and ancient birch woodlands are immortalised in many Gaelic place names: examples include Glen an Beithe, Allt Beithe, and Beith in Ayrshire; the … Continue reading Tree Folklore: Birch, the Lady of the Wood – Jo Woolf

Froger’s Capybara and the Metaphysics of Memes – Blog – The Appendix

Froger's Capybara and the Metaphysics of Memes - Blog – The Appendix. "We brought three oxen, a few chickens, a tiger-cat, and another animal quite extraordinary, that the Portuguese call 'Capivard,' which has the body of a pig, the head of a rabbit, and thick hair the color of ash: it has no tail at all, … Continue reading Froger’s Capybara and the Metaphysics of Memes – Blog – The Appendix

Mandrakes – The Devil’s Apples

If a man suffers from any infirmity in the head, let him eat of the head of this plant: or if he suffers in the neck, let him eat of its neck: or if in his back, from its back: or if in his arm, from its arm : or if in his hand, from … Continue reading Mandrakes – The Devil’s Apples

Labyrinths and Ritual in Scandinavia

"In Västergötland, Sweden, a similar type of labyrinth game was reported in 1933: Here, people used to draw labyrinths in the snow on the ice during winter. The paths would be wide enough to skate on. In the center was a girl placed, who was called the “Bride of Grimborg”. Grimborg is a medieval legendary … Continue reading Labyrinths and Ritual in Scandinavia

The Trows of Orkney Folklore

Trows are fascinating creatures found only in the folklore of the Orkney and Shetland islands. Yet, describing them accurately is difficult because sources are not always clear. Folklorists have long insisted that the word “trow” is a corruption of “troll,” and that Orkney’s Trows descend from their Viking ancestors’ stories of Trolls. Sigurd Towrie, author … Continue reading The Trows of Orkney Folklore

The Rose of The World – The Metaphilosophy of History by Daniil Andreev

Gamayun is a prophetic bird of Russian folklore. It is a symbol of wisdom and knowledge and lives on an island in the east, close to paradise. Like the Sirin and the Alkonost, the Gamayun is normally depicted as a large bird with a woman’s head. In his esoteric Christian-Buddhist cosmography Roza Mira, Daniil Andreev … Continue reading The Rose of The World – The Metaphilosophy of History by Daniil Andreev