The Night of the Hunter – the most unusual and experimental film made in Hollywood in the 1950s

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwlSrpMK3VA

The film's score, composed and arranged by Walter Schumann in close association with Laughton, features a combination of nostalgic and expressionistic orchestral passages. The film has two original songs by Schumann, "Lullaby" (sung by Kitty White, whom Schumann discovered in a nightclub) and "Pretty Fly" (originally sung by Sally Jane Bruce as Pearl, but later dubbed by an actress named Betty Benson). The film was shot in black and white in the styles and motifs of German Expressionism (bizarre shadows, stylized dialogue, distorted perspectives, surreal sets, odd camera angles) to create a simplified and disturbing mood that reflects the sinister character of Powell, the nightmarish fears of the children, and the sweetness of their savior Rachel. In a 2007 listing of the 100 Most Beautiful Films, Cahiers du cinéma ranked The Night of the Hunter No. 2 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Night_of_the_Hunter_%28film%29

A short film about artist Leon Spilliaert

https://youtu.be/iNt1jtm2Pm8 (more) https://youtu.be/o2r9ya6wzZY Spilliaert was born in Ostend, the oldest of seven children of Léonard-Hubert Spilliaert, who was a perfumer, and Léonie (née Jonckheere). From childhood, he displayed an interest in art and drawing. A prolific doodler and autodidact, he was predominantly a self-taught artist. Sickly and reclusive, he spent most of his youth sketching scenes of … Continue reading A short film about artist Leon Spilliaert

Edward Steichen – To Catch an Instant

"Photography records the gamut of feelings written on the human face, the beauty of the earth and skies that man has inherited, and the wealth and confusion man has created. [It is] a major force in explaining man to man." Steichen Quoted in Time Magazine, "To Catch the Instant" 7 April 1961 Edward Jean Steichen … Continue reading Edward Steichen – To Catch an Instant

Max Ernst – La femme 100 tetes

"Max Ernst's collage book "La femme 100 têtes", originally published in 1929. directed by Eric Duvivier The book consisted of a surrealist picture per page, with a little legend. But the story depended on the ability of the reader to interpret the collages, and was not relying that much on the legends. The book was … Continue reading Max Ernst – La femme 100 tetes