The Wandering and Watercolours of Hermann Hesse

“This wind, into which I am climbing, is fragrant of beyonds and distances, of watersheds and foreign languages, of mountains and southern places. It is full of promise.” ― Hermann Hesse, Wandering I was very lucky yesterday, while mooching through piles of 2nd hand books at a Spanish fleamarket,  to spy and purchase a copy … Continue reading The Wandering and Watercolours of Hermann Hesse

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Nietzsche on How to Find Yourself – Brain Pickings

How can man know himself? It is a dark, mysterious business: if a hare has seven skins, a man may skin himself seventy times seven times without being able to say, “Now that is truly you; that is no longer your outside.” It is also an agonizing, hazardous undertaking thus to dig into oneself, to … Continue reading Nietzsche on How to Find Yourself – Brain Pickings

The Perennial Philosophy of Aldous Huxley

"Knowledge is a function of being." - Aldous Huxley "Based upon the direct experience of those who have fulfilled the necessary conditions of such knowledge, this teaching is expressed most succinctly in the Sanskrit formula, tat tvam asi (“That art thou”); the Atman, or immanent eternal Self, is one with Brahman, the Absolute Principle of … Continue reading The Perennial Philosophy of Aldous Huxley

Both the landscape and its beholder – Simone de Beauvoir

Formerly, I had been quite satisfied with myself, but I had taken very little trouble to increase my self-knowledge; from now on, I would stand outside myself, watch over and observe myself; in my diary I had long conversations with myself. I was entering a world whose newness stunned me. I learned to distinguish between … Continue reading Both the landscape and its beholder – Simone de Beauvoir

The four faults of natural awareness from the Shangpa tradition

The Borscht of times, the Würste of times

The four faults of natural awareness from the Shangpa tradition

So close you can’t see it

So deep you can’t fathom it

So simple you can’t believe it

So good you can’t accept it

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Steppenwolf: “The Genius of Suffering” by Hassan M. Malik

Steppenwolf: “The Genius of Suffering” by Hassan M. Malik “Like Goethe, a Hesse novel is an integral part of a broader paradigm, which reflects the author’s maturing thought, morals, and ideas at that particular point in his life. Hesse wrote Steppenwolf when he was about fifty years old. His health was on a decline, and … Continue reading Steppenwolf: “The Genius of Suffering” by Hassan M. Malik

Balzac: The more he saw

The more he saw, the more he doubted. He watched men narrowly, and saw how, beneath the surface, courage was often rashness; and prudence, cowardice; generosity, a clever piece of calculation; justice, a wrong; delicacy, pusillanimity; honesty, a modus vivendi; and by some strange dispensation of fate, he must see that those who at heart … Continue reading Balzac: The more he saw