Titus Burckhardt: Alchemy – Science of the Cosmos, Science of the Soul

I thought I'd share a link where you can download pdf files of 7 works by Titus Burckhardt. (or you can read them online, as above) Titus Burckhardt at Archive.org edit: This is currently offline but you can read his Introduction To Sufi Doctrine here: https://newbooksinpolitics.com/political/introduction-to-sufi-doctrine/   As an example, here's the Table of Contents … Continue reading Titus Burckhardt: Alchemy – Science of the Cosmos, Science of the Soul

William Stukeley’s 1740 book on Stonehenge online 

Harvard University Library hosts a digitised copy of William Stukeley’s 1740 book, Stonehenge, a temple restor’d to the British Druids. Printed in London in 1740 the book includes more than 30 illustrations showing how Stonehenge appeared when Stukeley visited it in the early 18th century, along with his theories concerning the monument’s origins and use. Image: Prospect of STONEHENGE from the southwest from William … Continue reading William Stukeley’s 1740 book on Stonehenge online 

Nietzsche on How to Find Yourself – Brain Pickings

How can man know himself? It is a dark, mysterious business: if a hare has seven skins, a man may skin himself seventy times seven times without being able to say, “Now that is truly you; that is no longer your outside.” It is also an agonizing, hazardous undertaking thus to dig into oneself, to … Continue reading Nietzsche on How to Find Yourself – Brain Pickings

Harry Clarke’s Looking Glass | The Public Domain Review

  With their intricate line and often ghoulish tone, the works of Irish artist Harry Clarke are amongst the most striking in the history of illustration and stained glass design. Kelly Sullivan explores how, unknown to many at the time, Clarke took to including his own face in many of his pictures.       … Continue reading Harry Clarke’s Looking Glass | The Public Domain Review

The lost children of Hamelin | Maria J. Pérez Cuervo

“In the year of 1284, on the day of Saints John and Paul, the 26th of June, 130 child­ren born in Hamelin were seduced by a piper, dressed in all kinds of colours, and lost at the calvary near the koppen.” The town of Hamelin hasn’t forgotten this loss. The street where, supposedly, the children … Continue reading The lost children of Hamelin | Maria J. Pérez Cuervo

The Redemption of Saint Anthony | Gustave Flaubert and Odilon Redon

Gustave Flaubert, best known for his masterpiece Madame Bovary, spent nearly thirty years working on a surreal and largely ‘unreadable’ retelling of the temptation of Saint Anthony. It was only in the dark and compelling illustrations of Odilon Redon, made years later, that Flaubert’s strangest work finally came to life. Colin Dickey explains in the … Continue reading The Redemption of Saint Anthony | Gustave Flaubert and Odilon Redon

The Gold Tree, with initials designed by Austin O Spare

The gold tree. With initials designed by Austin O. Spare and cut in wood by W. Quick. Published 1917 The Gold Tree is a short story written by Sir John Collings Squire, in which he describes in detail an imagined bookshop that appears frequently in his dreams.  It can be viewed and read here: https://archive.org/stream/goldtreewithinit00squiuoft#page/n5/mode/2upContinue reading The Gold Tree, with initials designed by Austin O Spare

“He was an illumination thrown upon life.”

" Specialism consists in seeing the things of the material world as well as those of the spiritual world in their original and consequential ramifications. The highest human genius is that which starts from the shadows of abstraction to advance into the light of specialism. (Specialism, species, sight, speculation, seeing all, and that at one … Continue reading “He was an illumination thrown upon life.”

Ptak Science Books: Rising to a Higher State of Misery: Books Read by Frankenstein’s “Monster”

"The animated human created by Victor Frankenstein in 20-year-old Mary Shelley's anonymously published Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus was a far more intelligent being than was ever portrayed in the many movies that made the novel famous in the 20th century. “Frankenstein” refers to Dr. Victor, not the creation, who refers to himself as the … Continue reading Ptak Science Books: Rising to a Higher State of Misery: Books Read by Frankenstein’s “Monster”

The Hermit; or, The Unparalleled Sufferings, and Surprising Adventures, of Philip Quarll (1814) | The Public Domain Review

A story thought to be by Peter Longueville – writing under the pseudonym of Edward Dorrington – about Philip Quarll, a Crusoe-style castaway, who spends 50 years alone on an uninhabited island island of monkeys and pomegranate fields far off the coast of Mexico. When eventually he is eventually found in 1715 by the narrator … Continue reading The Hermit; or, The Unparalleled Sufferings, and Surprising Adventures, of Philip Quarll (1814) | The Public Domain Review