The allegory of the Cave of the Nymphs in the Thirteenth Book of Homer’s Odyssey

"High at the head a branching olive grows And crowns the pointed cliffs with shady boughs. A cavern pleasant, though involved in night, Beneath it lies, the Naiades delight: Where bowls and urns of workmanship divine And massy beams in native marble shine; On which the Nymphs amazing webs display, Of purple hue and exquisite … Continue reading The allegory of the Cave of the Nymphs in the Thirteenth Book of Homer’s Odyssey

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Nehalennia

Nehalennia is known from more than 160 votive altars, which were almost all discovered in the Dutch province of Zeeland.

The Tarjuman al-Ashwaq – Medieval Sufi Wisdom Text

"This text is of great interest, aside from its literary merits as delightful (but highly encoded) Sufi love poetry, because the author supplied extensive commentary for each poem. This is key to disentangling the Sufi narrative from the exterior form of the work. At this level, rather than a series of love poems to a … Continue reading The Tarjuman al-Ashwaq – Medieval Sufi Wisdom Text

The Virga Aurea – Seventy-two magical and other related alphabets by Adam McLean

  By Adam McLean. First published in the Hermetic Journal 1980. The Virga Aurea, or to give the full title, "The Heavenly Golden Rod of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Seventy-two Praises" consists of a list of seventy two alphabets (actually seventy, plus Latin and Hebrew which are the two languages of the text of … Continue reading The Virga Aurea – Seventy-two magical and other related alphabets by Adam McLean

And now his blood comes out singing: On Federico García Lorca’s Last Days | Literary Hub

Before dawn on August 17th, 1936, a man dressed in white pajamas and a blazer stepped out of a car onto the dirt road connecting the towns of Víznar and Alfacar in the foothills outside Granada, Spain. He had thick, arching eyebrows, a widow’s peak sharpened by a tar-black receding hairline, and a slight gut … Continue reading And now his blood comes out singing: On Federico García Lorca’s Last Days | Literary Hub

William James’s influential papers on ‘The Varieties of Religious Experience’

William James (1842–1910) was an American philosopher and psychologist. James was a leading thinker of the late nineteenth century, one of the most influential U.S. philosophers; his groundbreaking papers and discussions known as "The Varieties of Religious Experience" would influence both Carl Jung and Aldous Huxley.   Along with Charles Sanders Peirce, James established the … Continue reading William James’s influential papers on ‘The Varieties of Religious Experience’

Rilke’s “Requiem For a Friend”

Rainer Maria Rilke's "Requiem for a Friend" as translated from the German by Stephen Mitchell Rainer Maria Rilke (1875-1926) wrote "Requiem For a Friend" as a tribute to his good friend, the painter Paula Modersohn-Becker (1876-1907), who suddenly died eighteen days after giving birth to her first child. Rilke wrote it over two haunted nights … Continue reading Rilke’s “Requiem For a Friend”

METROPOLIS: Gillette’s Utopian City Proposal

Before perfecting his invention of the safety razor and founding what became a major American industrial and sales enterprise, King Camp Gillette (1855-1932) authored several books and pamphlets calling for radical changes in the country's economic and social system. The first of these polemical tracts, The Human Drift, called for the establishment of an ideal … Continue reading METROPOLIS: Gillette’s Utopian City Proposal

Beardsley and his Work – Aubrey Beardsley tv Documentary from 1982

  Aubrey Beardsley was a phenomenon, as his contemporaries recognised. Between 1893 and 1898 (when he died from tuberculosis aged just 25) he developed into one of the world's most exciting graphic artists, and turned out hundreds of black and white drawings, which retain their power to fascinate, to amuse and to shock. In this … Continue reading Beardsley and his Work – Aubrey Beardsley tv Documentary from 1982

French Symbolist painter, mystic and philosopher Maurice Chabas (1862-1947) By Dr. Myriam de Palma

"French Symbolist painter Maurice Chabas came from a family of painters, including brother Paul Chabas. Maurice Chabas was born on September 26th 1862, in Nantes, in a cultured and scholarly family. The eldest boy, according to the customs of the time, Chabas took over the family business as an adult despite the fact that he … Continue reading French Symbolist painter, mystic and philosopher Maurice Chabas (1862-1947) By Dr. Myriam de Palma