Who Am I? – Relationships ~ by Jaq White

tumblr_m18qllFj2T1qmemvwo1_500Continuing the theme of “Who am I?” today I’m going to focus on relationships. Often in a relationship, we can feel a bit lost. We’re told that relationships are a compromise, but we also need to make sure that we don’t make so many compromises that we end up asking “where did I go?”

We can lose oursleves pretty quickly in a relationship, for many reasons which I’m sure we’re all aware of. We may at some point find that we have agreed to an entire life plan, whether consciously or not, either to keep one person happy or, as a compromise whereby neither person is actually fulfilled.

One clue as to when this has occurred, is when people start to think “I have everything I always wanted but…” or “I am doing what I always wanted but….”

It is likely they may even only use the word “we” instead of “I”. Some people still use the word “we” years after a relationship has ended: “We went there.”  They stop seeing themselves as an individual, and in some cases, their memory only sees the other person, and their feelings about a place or situation is completely based on their memory of how that other person felt about it.

Paulo Coello has summed this up brilliantly in a passage in his book The Zahir.

“Marie, let’s suppose that two firemen go into a forest to put out a small fire. Afterwards, when they emerge and go over to a stream, the face of one is all smeared with black, while the other man’s face is completely clean. My question is this: which of the two will wash his face?”

“That’s a silly question. The one with the dirty face of course.”

“No, the one with the dirty face will look at the other man and assume that he looks like him. And, vice versa, the man with the clean face will see his colleague covered in grime and say to himself: I must be dirty too. I’d better have a wash.’What are you trying to say?’I’m saying that, during the time I spent in the hospital, I came to realize that I was always looking for myself in the women I loved. I looked at their lovely, clean faces and saw myself reflected in them. They, on the other hand, looked at me and saw the dirt on my face and, however intelligent or self-confident they were, they ended up seeing themselves reflected in me thinking that they were worse than they were. Please, don’t let that happen to you.”

This is akin to the Jungian concept of the animus/anima. Author and Psychologist Peter O’Connor explains this beautifully, when he writes that “Narcissistic and idealised longings for paradise exist in all human beings”. He explains that we often project the qualities of this fantasy person who fulfills our every need, onto real mortals with whom we “fall” in love. If we lack self-awareness, we don’t understand that we were or are seeing this person as a symbolic expression of part of ourselves. Some people never realise this, and insist that the other person has “changed” if they begin to express themselves in ways that don’t fit this idealised version.

Another analogy Coelho uses is that of a railway track. The two tracks are always the same distance apart, no matter how the route twists and turns, both have to go side by side, exactly the same distance. Do relationships have to be like railroad tracks? Who says?

As I’ve written in some of my earlier blog posts, when we learn to Know Ourselves, understand ourselves and love ourselves, we learn the purest kind of love, and we can bring that unconditional love into our relationships with friends and with partners/lovers.

Paulo Coelho’s The Zahir is a wonderful example of how one man comes to learn this.

I’ll finish this with some of his words:

“Esther asked why people are sad. “That’s simple,” says the old man. “They are the prisoners of their personal history. Everyone believes that the main aim in life is to follow a plan. They never ask if that plan is theirs or if it was created by another person. They accumulate experiences, memories, things, other people’s ideas, and it is more than they can possibly cope with. And that is why they forget their dreams.”

[if people ask themselves why they are unhappy] “If we ask that question, it means we want to find out what makes us happy. If what makes us happy is different from what we have now, then we must either change once and for all or stay as we are, feeling even more unhappy.”

“Esther, however, was the only woman who understood one very simple thing: in order to be able to find her, I first had to find myself.”

Paulo Coelho, The Zahir

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2 thoughts on “Who Am I? – Relationships ~ by Jaq White”

  1. Relationships are complicated things, and years I struggled with that. I formed the idea of Trade Contract to define relationships, thus I consider a relationship to be a trade, so that each side brings something of value to the table to the other, and both leave the table a winner. The alternative is the parasitic relationship where one party is the loser in the deal, those types I eliminate although sometimes some parasites have to be retained in the equation.

    Here are three ideas:
    Bridge – this is the relationship, who do you allow across your bridge?
    Space – your life, who would you allow to invade your space?
    Carrying – who would you carry across the river of life?

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  2. That’s a good practical approach in applying those 3 ideas Alex; they’re a very good test of our own values.

    And yes, I agree there’s definitely trading involved.

    I suppose the important thing is to be aware of that ‘trading’, and to keep checking back in to see if the trade off is still as fair as it might be?

    We could ask ourselves what are we bringing to the table?
    Is it (still) of value to the other person?
    Is it (still) of value to me?
    Then to ask whether the other person is (still) bringing something we value to the table.

    We may fall into the trap of not checking whether what we’re bringing is still of value to either of us, purely of habit, assumption and routine.

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