Santiago de Compostela – Iacchus and The Green Language of the Camino – Ars, Arte et Labore

Innumerable and symbolic personalities: the Crow and the Swan, the Lion and the Dragon, the King and the Queen, etc., each of which poses their particular enigma for him to solve. It is only after having understood the secret meaning of these symbols that the pilgrim will finally see rise, shining in the heart of … Continue reading Santiago de Compostela – Iacchus and The Green Language of the Camino – Ars, Arte et Labore

The Language of Birds in Old Norse Tradition

Reblog re The Language of the Birds, The Green Language

Ars, Arte et Labore

Special individuals capable of understanding the language of birds are spread throughout the medieval Icelandic literary corpus.This phenomenon has received surprisingly little academic attention and is deserving of detailed, extensive, and interdisciplinary study.
Capable of flight and song, birds universally hold a special place in human experience. Their effective communication to people in Old Norse lore offers another example of their unique role in humanity’s sociocosmic reality.

Manuscript_Odinn Huginn and Muninn sit on Odin’s shoulders in an illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript

Birds consistently offer important information to individuals associated with kingship and wisdom. The wide chronological and geographical range of this motif will be explored as well as the fascinating theoretical questions regarding why birds are nature’s purveyors of wisdom. With their capacity to fly and sing, birds universally hold a special place in human experience as symbols of transcendence and numinous knowledge; Old Norse tradition reflects this…

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The Language of the Birds and the Book of Thoth.

Reblogging a few old posts on The Language of the Birds & The Green Language

Ars, Arte et Labore

My interest in the esoteric began in earnest when I was studying Egyptology and came across some literature from the Ptolemeic period of Ancient Egypt; stories about one of the sons of Ramesses II, who had lived centuries earlier.  This prince, Khaemwaset, was already a fascinating historical character, as among other major works, he had overseen the founding of an important library in honour of his father, (the Ramesseum) and restored several pyramid complexes, including those at Giza which were already a couple of thousand years old when he was alive, and has led to him being hailed as the world’s first archaeologist, historian, and restorer of monumental architecture. So to discover that he should have been immortalised in stories as being the greatest magician that ever lived, in having discovered the Book of Thoth, and having travelled to the Underworld while still alive, suggests an oral history…

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The Bone Setter of Anglesey: the mystery of the shipwrecked boy of 1745 and his legacy

In the 18th Century, a mystery boy who could not speak a word of Welsh or English washed up in Anglesey after a shipwreck - and helped to revolutionise Western medicine with never-seen-before bone-setting skills. The boy was one of two who found themselves the only survivors of a shipwreck off the north Anglesey coast, … Continue reading The Bone Setter of Anglesey: the mystery of the shipwrecked boy of 1745 and his legacy

The Uncanny Art of Léon Spilliaert via Apollo Magazine, with link to virtual tour of current exhibition at Royal Academy of Arts

From Apollo Magazine 25/03/2020 It is the sense of the uncanny working hand in glove with the familiar that sets Spilliaert apart from Symbolist precursors such as Edvard Munch or Odilon Redon. Spilliaert was close to the Belgian Symbolist poets in his younger years. In 1903 he was commissioned to illustrate by hand the publisher … Continue reading The Uncanny Art of Léon Spilliaert via Apollo Magazine, with link to virtual tour of current exhibition at Royal Academy of Arts

The allegory of the Cave of the Nymphs in the Thirteenth Book of Homer’s Odyssey

"High at the head a branching olive grows And crowns the pointed cliffs with shady boughs. A cavern pleasant, though involved in night, Beneath it lies, the Naiades delight: Where bowls and urns of workmanship divine And massy beams in native marble shine; On which the Nymphs amazing webs display, Of purple hue and exquisite … Continue reading The allegory of the Cave of the Nymphs in the Thirteenth Book of Homer’s Odyssey

Nehalennia

Nehalennia is known from more than 160 votive altars, which were almost all discovered in the Dutch province of Zeeland.

The Tarjuman al-Ashwaq – Medieval Sufi Wisdom Text

"This text is of great interest, aside from its literary merits as delightful (but highly encoded) Sufi love poetry, because the author supplied extensive commentary for each poem. This is key to disentangling the Sufi narrative from the exterior form of the work. At this level, rather than a series of love poems to a … Continue reading The Tarjuman al-Ashwaq – Medieval Sufi Wisdom Text

The Virga Aurea – Seventy-two magical and other related alphabets by Adam McLean

  By Adam McLean. First published in the Hermetic Journal 1980. The Virga Aurea, or to give the full title, "The Heavenly Golden Rod of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Seventy-two Praises" consists of a list of seventy two alphabets (actually seventy, plus Latin and Hebrew which are the two languages of the text of … Continue reading The Virga Aurea – Seventy-two magical and other related alphabets by Adam McLean

And now his blood comes out singing: On Federico García Lorca’s Last Days | Literary Hub

Before dawn on August 17th, 1936, a man dressed in white pajamas and a blazer stepped out of a car onto the dirt road connecting the towns of Víznar and Alfacar in the foothills outside Granada, Spain. He had thick, arching eyebrows, a widow’s peak sharpened by a tar-black receding hairline, and a slight gut … Continue reading And now his blood comes out singing: On Federico García Lorca’s Last Days | Literary Hub